Institutional Research Terminology Defined

American Indian or Alaskan Native - A person who reports herself/himself as having origins in any of the original peoples of North America, or who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition (including international persons lawfully admitted as permanent residents or holding political asylum visas).

Asian or Pacific Islander - A person who reports herself/himself as having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian Subcontinent, or Pacific Islands. This includes people from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands, Samoa, India, and Vietnam (including international persons lawfully admitted as permanent residents or holding political asylum visas.)

Baccalaureate Subsidy – A subsidy level assigned to all courses which are specialized within a discipline for the baccalaureate degree. The course should be considered specialized when a specific set of knowledge or skills is required prior to enrollment. Typically these courses are reserved for students majoring in the field. This level is also assigned to specialized courses designed to serve a related discipline. Within this subsidy level are three models identified as Baccalaureate I, Baccalaureate II, and Baccalaureate III; each model increasing in the amount of subsidy awarded by the state.

Black, non-Hispanic - A person who reports herself/himself as having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa (except those of Hispanic origin and including international persons lawfully admitted as permanent residents or holding political asylum visas).

Course Credit Hours (CCH) – Used in credit hour production reporting, it is the number of total coursework (semester) credit hours calculated by multiplying each course’s credit hours by the number of students enrolled in that course. For example, a 3 semester hour Art course with 27 enrolled students generates 81 course credit hours (3 X 27 = 81). The grand total of CCH generated by all courses for any given term equals the grand total of Student Credit Hours (SCH) generated by all students in all courses for that same term.

Doctoral – Graduate students who have been formally admitted to a graduate program in which this institution awards a doctoral degree.

Doctoral/Doctorate Subsidy – A subsidy level assigned to all courses specifically designed for the instruction of doctoral students in which enrollment is normally available only to students who have progressed beyond the level of a master's degree. The doctoral level component of a graduate course designed to serve both this level and the master's level is also assigned to the doctoral level. Within this level are two models Prepared by the Office of Institutional Research 10/27/2005 identified as Doctoral I and Doctoral II; each model increasing in the amount of subsidy awarded by the state.

Employee/Faculty FTE - Each full-time employee (including faculty, administrators and staff) is counted as 1.00 FTE. Part-time employees are assigned a value less than 1.00 FTE in accordance with their contract specifications. Full-time administrators and staff members who also teach on a part-time basis may have a total University FTE larger than 1.00.

First-Time Undergraduates – Undergraduate students who are enrolled at an institute of higher education for the first time since high school graduation (including students who have earned a GED). Because some students may have attended a college or university while still enrolled in high school – earning both high school and college course credit – some students in this category may hold ranks higher than freshmen (e.g.. sophomores, juniors, etc.).

Flexibly Scheduled Course Sections – All course sections not meeting during this institution’s regular academic term, or all course sections meeting during the regular academic term offered in a substantially different manner than a fixed number of meeting times per week for all weeks of the term. The following types of instruction are the only exceptions (i.e., are considered regular courses): student teaching; practicum or internships; coops, self-paced study; independent study courses; courses offered on a quarter calendar when the institution is on a semester calendar; and course sections offered as part of a continuous module format.

Freshmen – Undergraduate students who have earned 0–31 semester hours regardless of the percentage of credit hours earned toward the award of an undergraduate degree.

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) – See YSU’s semester student FTE, Ohio Board of Regents FTE, or Employee/Faculty FTE.

Full-Time Graduate Students – Graduate students who are enrolled for 9 or more semester hours for a given term.

Full-Time Undergraduate Students – Undergraduate students who are enrolled for 12 or more semester hours for a given term.

Grads with less than 34 semester hours completed – Graduate students who have earned baccalaureate degrees, are permitted to enroll in graduate courses, have no immediate graduate degree goals and by the end of the preceding academic term have earned less than 34 semester hours.

Grads with 34 or greater than semester hours completed – Graduate students who have earned baccalaureate degrees, are permitted to enroll in graduate courses, have no immediate graduate degree goals and by the end of the preceding academic term have earned 34 or more semester hours.

Graduates – Masters degree-seeking students who have been formally admitted to a graduate program.

General Studies Subsidy – A subsidy level assigned to all courses which are general, introductory, or core courses. Courses which satisfy distributive requirements, the set of courses which provide students with a broad knowledge base, generally in the humanities, natural sciences and social sciences, for an associate or baccalaureate degree should be assigned to the General Studies level. Within this subsidy level are three models identified as General Studies I, General Studies II, and General Studies III; each model increasing in the amount of subsidy awarded by the state.

Hispanic - A person who reports herself/himself as Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race (including international persons lawfully admitted as permanent residents or holding political asylum visas).

International (Nonresident Alien) – A person who is not a citizen or national of the United States and who is in this country on a visa or a temporary basis and does not have the right to remain indefinitely. Resident aliens who are not citizens or nationals of the United States and who have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence (i.e., internationals with permanent resident or political asylum visas) are to be reported in the appropriate racial/ethnic categories described above.

Juniors - Undergraduate students who have earned 63-93 semester hours regardless of the percentage of credit hours earned toward the award of an undergraduate degree.

Masters Subsidy – A subsidy level assigned to all courses which are designed for graduate instruction and are not specifically designed for doctoral students (see Doctoral). Courses which represent the graduate level component of advanced undergraduate courses (where a specific designation has been made that the course is creditable toward a graduate degree) are assigned to this level, as are the master's level components of a graduate courses designed to serve both this level and the doctoral level. Within this model are four models identified as Masters/Professional I, Masters/Professional II, Masters/Professional III and Blended Masters/Professional/Doctoral I. For Masters/Professional I through III each model increases in the amount of subsidy awarded by the state. The Blended Masters/Professional/Doctoral I level is reserved for assignment to business and education coursework only.

Non-Traditional (age) – Students who are 25 years of age or older.

Not Classified Undergraduates – Undergraduate students, regardless of previous academic experience or achievement, who are enrolled for undergraduate course work but have no immediate degree goal.

Ohio Board of Regents (OBOR) FTE - The grand total of course credit hours for a specific semester for the entire university divided by 30. Thirty is the recognized number of credit hours the state (OBOR) is recognizing for institutions utilizing a semester calendar.

Open Admissions – Youngstown State University offers broad access to higher education through open admission for all Ohio high school graduates. However, admission to the University does not guarantee admission to every program. Some programs within the University have separate admission standards that must be met before a student may enroll in that particular program.

Part-Time Graduate Students – Graduate students who are enrolled for less than 9 semester hours for a given term.

Part-Time Undergraduate Students – Undergraduate students who are enrolled for less than 12 semester hours for a given term.

Preliminary Enrollment – Enrollments reported on the Institutional Research web site are extracted from database computer files that are frozen on 14th day of the specified term. These preliminary 14th day data do not account for registration adds and drops that were not processed by the end of the business day on the 14th day after the first day of the term. While enrollments and FTE associated with flexibly scheduled courses and workshops for which students are registered prior to the 14th day are included in the “Preliminary” enrollment figures, all enrollments and FTE associated with flexibly scheduled courses and workshops awarding academic credit for the specified term are included in the “Official” 14th day enrollment. The “Official” enrollment is reported to the Ohio Board of Regents through the Higher Education Information (HEI) System approximately 30 days after the conclusion of the term.

Regional Service Area – Youngstown State University has a reduced non-resident surcharge for out-of-state students residing within key counties in New York, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Applicable counties “In the Regional Service Area” are: Chautauqua, New York; Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Clarion, Crawford, Erie, Fayette, Forest, Greene, Indiana, Jefferson, Lawrence, Mercer, Venango, Warren, Washington, and Westmoreland counties in Pennsylvania; and Brooke, Hancock, Marshall, and Ohio counties in West Virginia. All other out-of-state students are charged the “Not in the Regional Service Area” non-resident surcharge.

Seniors – Undergraduate students who have earned 94 or more semester hours regardless of the percentage of credit hours earned toward the award of an undergraduate degree.
Sophomores – Undergraduate students who have earned 32-62 semesters hours regardless of the percentage of credit hours earned toward the award of an undergraduate degree.

Student Credit Hours (SCH) – The number of total coursework (semester) credit hours enrolled by the student(s). For example, a student enrolled in a 4 semester hour English course, a 3 semester hour Biology course, a 5 semester hour Mathematics course, and a 3 semester hour Mechanical Engineering course generates 15 student credit hours (4 + 3 + 5 + 3 = 15). The grand total of SCH generated by all students in all courses for any given term equals the grand total of Course Credit Hours (CCH) generated by all courses for that same term.

Subsidy – the state of Ohio’s share of instructional costs based on OBOR FTE.

Subsidy Eligibility (Course Enrollments) – Individual course enrollments are ineligible for subsidy if the students are not enrolled for course credit (i.e., if the students are auditing the course.) Courses which do not offer college credit (zero credit hour courses, labs, etc.) are not eligible for subsidy. Courses offering college credit are eligible for subsidy.

Subsidy Eligibility (Students) - Students are identified as eligible or ineligible for subsidy


A. Students are ineligible for subsidy (according to the Ohio Board of Regents Higher Education Information (HEI) System’s guidelines) if


1. The student has not paid in full all instructional fees for any prior terms by the 15th day of the term. The student is also ineligible if he or she has not met one of the following three requirements by the end of the present term:
a. The student paid all instructional fees for the present term (not including parking or library fines or housing fees).
b. The student's financial aid and/or third party payment for the present term is in progress (examples of third parties could include state or federal government grants, student's employer, or union).
c. The student signed a note agreeing to pay all instructional fees according to the policies of the college or university for the present term.
2. They are graduate students who, by the preceding term, have earned more than 260 quarter or 174 semester credit hours.
3. The student meets the requirements for mandatory Selective Service registration, but has failed to register.
4. They are an undergraduate student who is not considered a legal resident of the State of Ohio for fee purposes.


B. Otherwise students are eligible for subsidy

Technical/Technology Subsidy – A subsidy level assigned to only those courses which are part of an associate degree program of technical education and are within the technical portion of a curriculum as defined by current Board of Regents’ program approval standards. Courses which are "basic" and "non-technical" within those standards should be assigned to the General Studies level. Within this subsidy level are two models identified as Technical I and Technical II; each model increasing in the amount of subsidy awarded by the state.
Traditional (age) – Students who are less than 25 years of age.

Unspecified – A person who does not report having origins in any of the specified racial/ethnic background categories.

White, non-Hispanic - A person who reports herself/himself as having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East (except those of Hispanic origin including international persons lawfully admitted as permanent residents or holding political asylum visas).

Workload - A numerical value assigned that reflects Teaching Hours (TH), Research Hours (RH), or Service Hours (SH) taking into consideration many factors and defined in guidelines that are consistent with the YSU OEA Agreement and YSU Board of Trustees Faculty Workload Policy. One TH equals one contact hour (50 minutes) of lecture instruction or 1.5 contact hours (75-85 minutes) of institutionally scheduled laboratory instruction each week over a sixteen week semester. The workload (TH) assigned to a course exists on the course inventory and is either based on the formula above for traditional courses or on a calculation specified and representative of the preliminary 14th day number of students or student credit hours. This calculation is subject to specified exceptions, modifications, and non-lecture equivalencies. Non-teaching hours (RH and SH) are approved by the department chairperson, Dean, and Provost and must be consistent with university policy. Faculty workload is a mix of a faculty member’s TH, RH, and SH assignments. FTE calculations based on faculty workload are: workload divided by 12 for term FTE; and, workload divided by 24 for annual FTE.

YSU’s Semester Student FTE - The grand total of course credit hours for a specific semester for the entire university divided by 15. Fifteen is the recognized number of credit hours a ‘typical’ full-time university student is expected to be enrolled for.
Prepared by the Office of Institutional Research 10/27/2005